Cursillo Bags

Another friend in Kuwait taught us to make these bags in various sizes. They are wonderful for traveling, for carrying make-up, jewelry, or charging cords, or medication, and keeping them sorted.

I made two sets of these bags for different Cursillo’s, 70 each time!

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That’s my “helper,” Ragnar, in the background. He gets jealous. He bites my cords, my computer cord, my sewing machine pedal cord, my telephone cords. He “helped” me buy a new quilting Bernina, (as I was waiting for a new pedal for my Pfaff) which I love for it’s quiet industriousness. I still also love my old faithful Pfaff, a real workhorse, and my ancient Singer Featherweight.

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New Duffle

In Kuwait, a wonderful woman we all called The Bag Lady taught us how to make these wonderful duffels – and also purses, and all kinds of bags. I had some fabulous fabric, with which I made my first duffel, and because I loved the fabric, I used the duffel all the time, in fact so much that this spring, I noticed that the straps on the duffel had become noticeably worn, thready and stringy.

And – I still had some of the original fabric! Enough I could make the pockets on a new bag. Woo hoo!

Here, you can see the old bag and the new bag, side by side. The old bag with its worn straps is on the left, and the new bag is on the right.

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I love the old bag so much that I’ve cut the pockets off to make small bags to use for jewelry, cosmetics, medications, charging cords, etc. The fabric I love has a new life!

2018 Charity Quilts

You’ve seen this quilt before in other color ways. I love that it makes the best use of fabric, uses every inch, and goes together relatively quickly. I am not patient with block assembly, but this one is relatively mindless, and gets the job done.

The original star was called a Sloppy Star. I wanted a much larger star, and re-designed it to fill a full 16″ square; when assembled, it comes in about 15″.

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The kids love the wild colors. The charity loves the wild colors, and displays a quilt for a while before they pass it along to a recipient 🙂

 

Quilt for a Special Mentor

For the last four years, I have been taking part in a theological study program, guided by a very special woman who led us through Old Testament, New Testament, church history and an overview of theological thought.

I am so grateful for her patient leadership though the thorny grounds of theological thinking. She allowed for freedom to explore our doubts and new concepts. I made this quilt for her.

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I have a good friend who quilted the quilt for me. It’s a special quilt, so I wanted it to be more perfect than my quilting. I love the way she was able to make the cross radiate.

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I totally loved this fabric, the major fabric in the quilt. It shaded from turquoise to green to purple and pink and orange and red, and gave the quilt a movement that delighted my heart.

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My friend quilted the metallic sections with a metallic thread, brave friend! Her quilting was perfect for the design.

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Pat’s Quilt

I have a wonderful friend. A year ago, her husband was diagnosed with cancer, the curable kind. Shortly after that, she was diagnosed with breast cancer.

This is one of the kindest people I have ever met. She and her husband made fighting cancer look easy. They almost managed to make it look like fun. After successful operations, multiple, and chemo, her husband died from complications related to the chemo.

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I wanted her to have a quilt to get through her own chemo, but I am slower than I used to be and not so good at beating a deadline.

I finally finished it this week, and got it to her. She loves that I included a couple blocks with a Florida State Seminole (go ‘Noles!)

If this looks familiar, it is because I made a similar, larger quilt for her daughter when she became engaged to our son. It’s one of my favorite patterns, scrappy heart, but I added a border to this one.

36 Strip Challenge

My quilt group had a thirty-six strip challenge. Nine of us cut four strips each for nine quilters, including one set of themselves. At one of our meetings, we put together identical collections of thirty-six strips, and then we each plotted a quilt which would use each fabric.

It sounds easy. It isn’t.

The fabrics are not at all compatible.

I hesitated, I searched for inspiration, I planned and discarded. Finally, I just plunged in, and the idea didn’t work, but it gave me an idea for something that might work. This meandering approach was new for me; normally I use quad notebooks and plan my quilts to the fraction of an inch.

The big flower in the upper central right part of the quilt is where I started, and where I was able to use eight fabrics. From there, I would look at the panel hanging and the fabric strips remaining, and overnight, another idea would come.

I actually started having fun with the project. It took me all summer, but it was work I enjoyed, much of it hand work, which I haven’t done a lot of lately.

My husband loves the finished project. I don’t love it, but I’m not unhappy with it.